RUST Power Minute: Splitter

RUST Power Minute: Splitter

A RUST Power Minute: Splitter

This quick RUST guide video, RUST Power Minute: Splitter, is brought to you by our partners Malonik & Gal.

In this video series, they take on the challenge of introducing, explaining, and showing how individual components are used in the RUST electrical and water systems, within 60 seconds.

In this episode, Gal gets his hands on the Splitter. He provides his opinion on this component and talks through the component’s primary usage, which is to split incoming power in two or three different channels.

With that, you’re here to watch the video!

Be sure to browse Malonik’s past videos and don’t forget to subscribe to his channel to receive notifications on his latest videos.

Video Transcript

RUST Power Minute: Splitter

Um yeah, I knew we’d get here eventually, but it’s hard right.

 

I really enjoy rust electricity, its fun to have a system of complexity and control layered over a world as chaotic and meaningless as Rust. So I really appreciate when Facepunch puts in the effort to think these systems through, like with electricity and farming. 

 

It speaks highly of them as developers, and I don’t want people to think I’m condemning the whole game when I say, every now and again, there’s a turd among the roses. You know, something that sticks out like the dog’s balls. A lot of people defend it, and I feel like it may have one or two uses in the game, but one or two isn’t enough, given the versatility of every other component.

 

No hang on, you know what, let’s get it done, this is Gal’s Rust power minute. And today we’re talking about the splitter.

 

One of the first components to hit the ground in the testing phase, the splitter is a simple component which literally splits any incoming power, 2 or 3 ways.

 

When any amount feeds in the top, ugh, it splits into as many lines as are occupied out the bottom.

 

Feed out two splits the power in half. Three splits the power into thirds.

 

If you know exactly how much power you need, and it can be split evenly into the circuits that require you, you might consider a splitter.

 

But that’s really only good for lower power circuits, if you have a blocker that you want to affect multiple door controllers, then four power is pretty cheap right.

 

I mean the components not cheap, it’s ten high qual, and you run the risk of losing all components if the power fluctuates just a little. 

 

Send it four power, and it eats one, splits the three, but if your power dips, then it tries to divide the remaining two among three sockets. It doesn’t work.

 

Which is really its biggest flaw, if the amount of power your sending it isn’t divisible by two or three, depending on the sockets then it’s very likely that the splitter will divide the power into decimal points which it rounds down by default.

 

No hang on they need to see this, run 12 power into a splitter, eats one down to 11, divides 11 by 3 for 3.6 power per socket, 12 in 9 out? so three power just gone.

What if each line needs 20 power and you’re feeding in 61 right, perfect right, dip just one electricity, and all three sockets stop working, there’s no priority they’re just all gone. Bang.

 

The power minutes have done when I say it’s done. Look at this prick, every other component plugs in from the top and out from the bottom.

 

It doesn’t align with the aesthetic of the rest of the components. It’s poorly modeled to the point of indolence. It has no interior circuits, just an empty box, but if they were saving on polygons, why have all the inverted geometry.

 

I honestly believe there’s a place in set aside in one of the deeper pits of hell for whoever designed the splitter.

 

Ahem, so yeah, that’s the splitter. Feel free to defend it in the comments, I’ve heard every argument before so I probably won’t address it, but make yourself heard, its a public forum.

 

Come say hi on the discord, like and subscribe, all that stuff.

 

Something-something ya mum.