12.8 Box Loot Room Bunker Base

12.8 Box Loot Room Bunker Base

12.8 Box Loot Room & Bunker Base Design

The 12.8 Box Loot Room & Bunker Base Design, was created by our partner Evil Wurst.

After Evil Wurst released his hyper-efficient 7.6 box loot room video, he set out on a challenge to build a more practical base designed that could be used at the start of a wipe and allowed for the following:

  1. No Blueprints or expensive items
  2. Work in confined spaces
  3. Easy Object Placement
  4. Can be easily re-built if destroyed
  5. Can be used with several people

This concept set off a competition in the RUST Youtube community, in which over 20 other players began submitting their hyper-efficient layouts to Evil Wurst. In this video, Evil Wurst highlights many of the approaches taken and uses a technique submitted from both, Lord Desert and Supplied, to create the 12.8 Box Loot Room. This is exactly 3 times the loot storage as a traditional loot room.

With Lord Desert’s design, Evil Wurst shows us how to add it to a unique bunker base design, with a modest cost and requiring 23 rockets to raid to either main loot or tool cupboard. This base features a hyper-efficient loot room inside of a 1×1, with 12.8 boxes worth of storage space. It remains compact, but costly to raid while having a single point of failure (its primary loot room).

Build Cost

  • Metal Fragments: 13,140
  • High-Quality Metal: 159
  • Wood: 3,866
  • Stone: 1,260

Upkeep Cost

  • Metal Fragments: 2,500
  • High-Quality Metal: 26
  • Wood: 9
  • Stone: 205

With that, you’re here to watch his video, enjoy!

Be sure to browse Evil Wurst’s past videos and don’t forget to subscribe to his channel to receive notifications on his latest videos.

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Video Transcript

Motivation

When I released my video on the new hyper-efficient 7.6 box loot room, my goal was to help you guys out with a practical alternative to the 7-box loot room, which was nerfed with the April 2019 update. I used the word practical, as maximizing storage was not the sole requirement.

 

My goal was to find a design that would also.

  1. Be suitable for the start of the wipe, which means not requiring any blueprints or expensive items
  2. Work in confined spaces, such as the Mini Frustrator, where the chute restricts movement and therefore the ability to place some boxes
  3. Be forgiving with the placement,
  4. so you don’t have to become an expert in box alignment to build it,
  5. that it ideally works well with sheet metal walls,
  6. and that you can rebuild it if the boxes got destroyed in a raid
  7. Allow to replace the door with all boxes placed
  8. Be easy to use with several people – if you play in a clan you know why

12.8 Box Loot Room Competition

Nevertheless, the video seems to have launched a competition laser-focused on maximizing the storage capacity while neglecting all other requirements. In particular, the insight that small boxes and BBQs are way more storage-efficient than large boxes seemed to have hit a nerve.

 

I received dozens of screenshots and videos showcasing even more efficient designs. While I cannot show you all of them, I want to highlight a few approaches:

9.6 Box Design

One common approach was to use a square floor tile for more space in the upper compartment and to use more BBQs. This is the design by OldFknFkr with 8.8 large boxes – The lower part of this design ended up in the 7.6 box loot room Necrosis managed to squeeze in more BBQs for a total of 9.6 large boxes. Squatt achieved the same capacity of 9.6 large boxes with a more elegant placement approach.

BBQs and Small Boxes

Two designs pursued the idea that if BBQ and small boxes are more space efficient, then loot rooms using solely those two items should provide even more storage. Deadz’ design provides the equivalent of 9.47 boxes. Supplied got it all the way up to 10.73 large boxes with this approach. Reaching the heights of what Twisited and Red Moon just showed as a few days ago.

Drop Boxes

Lord Desert and Supplied also looked into the use of drop boxes. Thanks to the clever combination of drop boxes, small boxes, and BBQs, both of them managed to squeeze the equivalent of about 12.8 large boxes into a 1×1 – that’s the same as 3 traditional loot rooms.

 

In this video, I am going to show you how to build Lord Desert’s design, and how to turn it into a simple bunker base.

12.8 Box Loot Room

To start, we need a 1×1 with a floor tile at half height.

 

First, we are going to place the 12 drop boxes. Place ceilings outside of the loot room and upgrade them all to sheet metal. Place 4 drop boxes from the outside onto each wall. Placing them from the outside will ensure that they stick less far into the loot room, leaving more space to other items.

 

Use the lines on the ceilings to place them as close to the center, verify that you can still place the honeycomb.

 

Next, place the 3 rear BBQs and boxes. Make sure that are as far back as possible. The forward legs should sit on the 3rd row of dots.

 

The outer BBQs don’t necessarily have to be as far to the side as possible. Place small boxes underneath each of the BBQs.

The forward BBQs have to be placed very exactly or you won’t be able to crouch into the loot room. Rotate them so that the lid opens away from the drop box. Align the rear two legs with the horizontal line of the foundation.

 

If there are 5 dots between the leg and the wall, they should be close enough to the wall to allow you to pass through. The small boxes should also go as close to the drop boxes as possible.

 

The upper part of the loot room is built the same way, so just repeat the previous steps.

How to Access

You may wonder how to access all those items, in particular the drop boxes. The forward drop boxes are best access from in front of the loot room.

 

To access the rear drop boxes, crouch into the loot room. It is not intuitive, but the drop boxes on the back wall are accessed THROUGH the BBQs. Move your pointer back and forth over the BBQ. Watch for the OPEN symbol to flicker to recognize when you are looking at the drop box behind the BBQ.

 

There you have it, a loot room with 12 drop boxes, 10 BBQs, and 10 small boxes – which is the equivalent of 32 small boxes or 12.8 large boxes.

 

And the best thing is, you can even add the garage door afterwards!

Bunker

If you wonder how to integrate this loot room into a base, it works perfectly with a simple stability bunker. I’ll be improvising one for you as an example. One somewhat odd thing I realized when I had finished the build is that I could not enter the lower part of the loot room anymore … because of the sleeping bag.

 

To solve this issue, the sleeping bags need to be rotated 90 degrees.

 

For the cost of 13k metal fragments and 160 high qual, you get a base where it takes at least 23 rockets to raid either main loot or the TC, and at least 26 rockets to raid both.

Thanks to the compact loot room, the upkeep of 2.5k metal fragments and 26 high qual remains manageable.

 

Of course, the design has its downsides. Cramming that much loot into a single space creates a single point of failure. Further, the design heavily dictates the build steps of the base.

 

Nevertheless, I hope you find this design inspiring. I find it mind-blowing how creative and productive the Rust builder community can be when it is pursuing a clear goal, such as cramming as much storage into a 1×1! Ah yes, and if you think about beating this one, the actual high score is another design by Lord Desert which fits the equivalent of 14.4 boxes.

 

It requires some really specific builds steps, which make it very impractical. However, if there is interest, I might showcase this in a future video.

 

Until then, Evil Wurst, out.